February 25, 2009

eglin fps-85 radar building

As drawn by artist Leah Beeferman, in a series entitled "Imagining the universe as seen by a building used to track orbital debris" (via things magazine):

leah-beeferman.jpg

This particular drawing is "Dedicated sensoring/how to hear with clarity". The drawings are quite nice, managing to be both delicate and imprecise (a bit like Klee?); the title adds a lift1 of melancholy. Beeferman describes the motivation behind the series:

"The Eglin FPS-85 radar is a building used by NASA to track orbital debris. Rooted to the ground, yet gazing toward the sky, this structure epitomizes the persistence and limitations of human exploration. My latest series of drawings picture the universe seen by the Eglin: a rotating mass of detritus, rocks, dust and information streams. I imagined the Eglin's desire to project itself into this space alongside its radar waves, to experience the clutter first-hand."

For comparison, the building itself:

eglin.jpg

[1] In landscape construction, 'lifts' are a way of describing the process of laying imported or excavated soil in repeated, measured thicknesses (often eighteen inches) in order to arrive at a desired finished grade with even compaction.

Posted by eatingbark at February 25, 2009 12:44 PM
Comments

Brings back the memories when I worked there - on the 5th floor in "SP" - Signal Processing.

Posted by: Jay Bullington at February 1, 2010 7:01 PM

You know nothing of the FPS-85 Radar system. I have been an on site mechanic for over 16 years. We serve a higher calling than you can ever conceive. Our personnel have done more for the Space Track Mission than you can ever believe. 20K objects a day pass through our scans. Leave your philosphy at home. We are the true warriors of the USAF Space Command

Posted by: Eglin Wage Slave at May 6, 2010 10:19 PM

I personaly selected and tracked manually, using the delay on a tectrronoc scope, the first object ever tracted on the rebuilt fps-85 in the late summer of 1967.

Posted by: zim at July 31, 2012 12:19 AM
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